Past Events

A conversation between Jay Parini and Wendy Moffat (August 4, 2016)
Poet, biographer, novelist, and scholar Jay Parini, author of Empire of Self: A Life of Gore Vidal (2015) and New and Collected Poems (2016), and biographer and scholar Wendy Moffat, author of A Great Unrecorded History: A New Life of E. M. Forster (2010) and the forthcoming Wounded Minds: Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, Thomas Salmon, and the Trauma of the First World War.

A conversation between Baron Wormser and Dawn Potter (August 11, 2016)
Baron Wormser, essayist, novelist, and former Poet Laureate of Maine, author of Unidentified Sighing Objects (2015) and The Road Washes Out in Spring (2012), and poet and essayist Dawn Potter, author of Same Old Story (2014) and the forthcoming The Vagabond’s Bookshelf.

A conversation between Megan Mayhew Bergman and Chard deNiord (August 18, 2016)
Fiction writer Megan Mayhew Bergman, author of Almost Famous Women (2015) and Birds of a Lesser Paradise (2012), and Chard deNiord, Poet Laureate of Vermont, author of Interstate (2015) and The Double Truth (2011).

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A conversation between Rachel Hadas and writer Alice B. Fogel (August 6, 2015)
Presently the Poet Laureate of New Hampshire, Alice B. Fogel is the author of four books of poems, including the new Intervals, based on Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Poet, essayist, and translator Rachel Hadas is author of more than a dozen books, including The Golden Road (poems) and Strange Relation, a memoir about a spouse’s dementia.

A conversation between Sue Miller and Douglas Bauer (August 13, 2015)
Sue Miller is author of a collection of short stories, a memoir, and ten novels, most recently The ArsonistDouglas Bauer is author of three novels and the essay collection What Happens Next? Matters of Life and Death, winner of the 2014 PEN/New England Book Award for Non-fiction.

A conversation between Ernest Hebert and Jeffrey Lent (August 20, 2015)
Ernest Hebert is author of ten novels, most recently Howard Elman’s Farewell, seventh volume of the Darby Chronicles. A former newspaper reporter, Hebert will retire this year from his longtime teaching position at Dartmouth College. Jeffrey Lent’s fifth novel has just been published: A Slant of Light, which returns to the Civil War era of his bestseller In the Fall.

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A conversation between Howard Norman and Jane Shore (August 7, 2014)
Howard Norman is a writer of fiction and nonfiction, and a scholar and teacher of folklore. His long list of books includes  the novels
The Bird Artist (1994), The Museum Guard (1998), The Haunting of L (2002), What is Left the Daughter (2010), and Next Life might be Kinder (2014), and the memoir I Hate to Leave this Beautiful Place. He is married to Jane Shore.
Jane Shore is a poet with books of poetry that span nearly five decades: Eye Level (1977), The Minute Hand (1987), Music Minus One (1996), Happy Family: Poems (1999), A Yes-or-No Answer:Poems (2008), and That Said: New and Selected Poems (2012).  She is married to Howard Norman.

A conversation between Jeff Sharlett and 40 Towns (August 14, 2014)
Jeff Sharlett is a professor of creative fiction at Dartmouth and author of many articles and several books, including
Killing the Buddha: A Heretic’s Bible, with Peter Manseau (2004), The Family: Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power (2008), Believer Beware: First-person Dispatches from the Margins of Faith, with Peter Manseau (2009), C Street (2010), and Sweet Heaven When I Die (2011).
40 Towns, in words from their web site,  “…is a periodical of literary journalism by students in Jeff Sharlett’s creative nonfiction courses at Dartmouth.”

A conversation between M.T. Anderson and Gregory Maguire (August 21, 2014)
M.T. Anderson is the author of books for young adults and children, including The
Pals in Peril series; Me, All Alone at the End of the World (2004); Thirsty (2008); The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Volumes I and II, the first volume Pox  winning the National Book Award (2008); and Feed, a National Book Award finalist (2012)
Gregory Maguire is a prolific writer of books for children and adults that span five decades, including The Wicked Years: Wicked (1995), Son of a Witch (2005), A Lion Among Men (2008), and Out of Oz (2011); Mirror Mirror (2003); and The Next Queen of Heaven (2010). Wicked, of course, is the source for the incredible Broadway musical of the same name.

A conversation between Jeffrey Harrison and Jim Rooney (August 28, 2014)
Jeffrey Harrison is a poet and teacher who has published several volumes of poems, including  Signs of Arrival (1996), Feeding the Fire: Poems (2001), Incomplete Knowledge(2006), The Names of Things: New and Collected Poems (2006), and Into Daylight (2014).
Jim Rooney has a long history as a musician and a music producer that includes producing Nanci Griffith’s Grammy-winning album Other Voices, Other Rooms.  He has written three books: Bossmen: Bill Monroe and Muddy Waters (1971), Baby Let Me Follow You Down, with Eric Von Schmidt (1979), and In it for the Long Run (2014).

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A conversation between poets Jennifer Militello and Cynthia Huntington (August 8, 2013)
Militello teaches at River Valley Community College in Claremont, N.H., and has just published her second book, Body Thesaurus. Huntington, who is the former Poet Laureate of New Hampshire, teaches at Dartmouth College and is author of four books of poetry and a prose memoir. Her most recent book Heavenly Bodies was a finalist for the 2012 National Book Award in poetry.

A conversation between Bill McKibben and Gus Speth (August 15, 2013)
A talk by environmental activist and author Bill McKibben, followed by a discussion with environmental reformer, Vermont Law School professor, and author Gus Speth. McKibben has written more than fifteen books, including the bestseller Eaarth, and was recently awarded the international Sophie Prize for environmental writing. Speth has authored three books, most recently America The Possible: Manifesto for a New Economy. He is a co-founder of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

A conversation between David Hinton and Ernest Hebert (August 22, 2013)
Readings and a conversation with essayist, poet, and translator David Hinton and novelist Ernest Hebert. Hinton is our era’s leading translator of Chinese prose and poetry; his new book Hunger Mountain: A Field Guide to Mind and Landscape combines detailed descriptions of hikes on Vermont’s Hunger Mountain with ruminations on language, creativity, and awareness. Hebert is the author of eleven books, including the six-book Darby series. A longtime newspaper reporter, he is a professor at Dartmouth College and his most recent novel Never Back Down is set in his hometown of Keene, New Hampshire.

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